leo weigand

Ohm’s Law

physics exhibition

Many concepts in physics refer to things not visible to the human eye, which can make it very difficult to comprehend them. The goal of this project was to pick one physics topic and explain it to museum visitors such that the invisible would become visible. The result was an interactive exhibit about Ohm’s Law – a fundamental relationship found in electronic circuits.

Concept

Put simply, Ohm's law says that if you increase the voltage in a circuit, the current goes up and if you increase the resistance, current goes down. To demonstrate this relationship, we came up with three stations for the respective influencing variables, which are arranged around a square table. Together, they form an electrical circuit symbolically shown by an led strip which connects them.

Interactive Stations

Voltage is set through five battery-shaped switches. The more switches are activated, the brighter the led circuit gets.

Voltage is set through five battery-shaped switches. The more switches are activated, the brighter the led circuit gets.

At the resistance station, visitors can activate a lamp and a loudspeaker, as well as set a variable resistance via a rotary knob. This gives a feel for how the values relate simply by turning the knob back and forth.

As the current is dependent on voltage and resistance, it cannot be manipulated directly.

Instead, visitors can observe an ammeter and see how the current changes. Furthermore, upon touching sensing copper plates, visitors may experience the flow of electricity safely as they start vibrating.

About

This project came about as part of the fourth semester course in exhibition design at the Schwäbisch Gmünd University of Applied Sciences. We worked in an interdisciplinary team of four with my responsibilities centering around concept development and prototyping.

Mentoring: Prof. Michael Schuster, Prof. Marc Guntow
Team: Anna-Lena C. Borck, Marianne Spiess, Toni Größchen
Special thanks: Sinn+Zweck Möbelbau for helping with construction.